by Simon Bond

Last week I picked up a new book to read titled "The everything store" by Brad Stone, all about Amazon.com. I started reading it and put it down when I read the very last page, in a word what I read is "frightening", that is for existing businesses and their old antiquated business models. There is a term in the book called "being Amazoned" which refers to what happens to an existing player's market when Amazon enters the game.

Recently Amazon has gone into the cloud computing market and the disruption they are causing for many existing players promises to alter the game for companies such as HP, IBM and others.

Amazon.com started off delivering books through the mail. But its visionary founder, Jeff Bezos, wasn’t content with being a bookseller. He wanted Amazon to become the everything store—a store that offered limitless selection and seductive convenience at disruptively low prices. To do so, he developed a corporate culture of relentless ambition that transformed retail in the same way Henry Ford revolutionized manufacturing.

Brad Stone enjoyed unprecedented access to current and former Amazon employees and Bezos family members, Bezos stands out for his restless pursuit of new markets, which has led Amazon into risky new ventures like the Kindle, Kindle Fire and its cloud computing business.

To him every new day is day one of the Internet and every day is just the beginning.

Investors need to think long and hard about which companies they are invested in and what the "new" risks may look like.

People think their world has already changed but it appears to me that the disruption has only just begun.